Asymmetry in plants

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12/26/2017 12:12 PM EST

Previously overlooked asymmetry has been found in <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Previously overlooked asymmetry has been found in Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. More about this image Research shows that the spiral pattern of leaf formation from the point of growth affects the developing leaf’s exposure to the plant hormone auxin. This exposure leads to …

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Science teams get time on Blue Waters

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12/26/2017 12:12 PM EST

First all-atom structure of an HIV virus capsid in its tubular form

From Klaus Schulten’s project about HIV infection, this image is of the first all-atom structure of an HIV virus capsid in its tubular form. Schulten and his team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are studying the protein capsid that encases the HIV-1 genome. The process through …

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Simulation shows how to detect rapidly spinning stellar core

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12/26/2017 12:12 PM EST

The inner regions of a collapsing, rapidly spinning massive star

The inner regions of a collapsing, rapidly spinning massive star. The colors indicate entropy, which roughly corresponds to heat: red regions are very hot, while blue regions are cold. The black arrows indicate the direction of the flow of stellar material. The two white curves with black outlines …

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“Biomineral Single Crystals”

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12/26/2017 12:12 PM EST

"Biomineral Single Crystals," by Pupa U.P.A. Gilbert and Christopher E. Killian, UW-Madiso

“Biomineral Single Crystals,” by Pupa U.P.A. Gilbert and Christopher E. Killian, University of Wisconsin, Madison. These fantastical structures are the microscopic crystals that make up a sea urchin’s tooth. Each shade of blue, aqua, green and purple–superimposed with Photoshop on a …

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Solar telescope reaches 120,000 feet on jumbo-jet-sized balloon

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12/26/2017 12:12 PM EST

Balloon the size of a Boeing 747 jumbo jet

In October 2007, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, and a team of research partners successfully launched a solar telescope to an altitude of 120,000 feet using this balloon, which is larger than a Boeing 747 jumbo jet. The test cleared the way for …

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